Chorus impact accentuators, often abbreviated to “CIAs,” is a term that’s still fairly new in this category — whether people know about it at all yet — but it keeps popping up more and more nowadays. Simply put, chorus impact accentuators are any element in a production that makes the chorus more impactful and powerful. That can be a reversed crash cymbal sample that flares up and preps our ears for a drop, or even a half a measure of complete silence leading up to the chorus, making its arrival all the more epic.

“For the Romantics, a great piece of art was a psychological sucker punch, knocking loose some terrifying unconfronted truth. The technical grandeur of Bach’s Chaconne (and his newfound role as Großvater of German music) had given it Himalayan stature — immovable, ancient, a platform from which to survey the universe.

+ Learn more on Soundfly: Master the processes and techniques for programming professional-grade electronic drum beats in Ableton Live with our mentored online course!

Youth music grants

Christine Elise Occhino is a serial entrepreneur with a passion for the music business. In addition to being a vocalist herself, she is the CEO of Elise Music Group, Artistic Director of The Pop Music Academy, and owner of Stamford Recording Studio. She is also the proud Founder and Executive Director of Hope in Harmony, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that uses music to help and heal those in need. Christine is a member of the Grammy Recording Academy, the American Society of Composers, Authors, & Publishers, and the Berklee College of Music Alumni Association. She has spoken on many music industry panels, contributed writing for music business publications for over a decade, and currently hosts the music-based web series and podcast, Soundbytez.

The problem is that these tendencies are the exact opposite of what we should be doing if we want to see real improvement, according to Dr. Anders Ericsson. And we might be wise to listen. Dr. Ericsson is widely considered one of the foremost thinkers on the subject of “expertise.” His research is one of the primary sources that inspired Malcolm Gladwell’s now-famous “10,000 Hour Rule” — that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to be an expert in anything. But that rule, though memorable, is far from the whole story.

Here are a handful of interesting ways that animals communicate to one another using sound signatures. Humans aren’t the only species with something to say!

For many artists, finding their ideal fan and learning to cultivate that relationship in a way that’s authentic can feel a little overwhelming. While there are many ways to do this, some of which we’ve outlined in past articles, today we wanted to explore a tool that has made fan growth a priority for the last decade or so via analytics and industry-wide insights — enter, Next Big Sound.

This Weezer tribute is a true chiptune classic. The lo-fi synth medium really helps emphasize the band’s knack for coming up with poppy, catchy, melodic rock hooks.

When was music unites founded

Simply insert a de-esser on your vocal channel and sweep through the frequencies in “listen” mode to find what’s causing the problem, then increase the threshold until the sibilance is squashed.

In a song known for its supremely catchy guitar riff (what else is new?), this is Hamilton’s moment of rising up to say, “Hey, don’t forget about the bass… it’s flashy, too!” The high run works particularly well juxtaposed against the lower notes he’s played up to that point in that section (which is basically the same riff as in the verses). Specifically, the vamping on C, then dropping down to the open E and walking up chromatically to the fifth below it (G), makes the shooting up to the next octave C and climbing up to the E above it sound really great together.

And yet, for the most part, it is a foreign way of thinking to our own: Much religious meaning in music today is practiced, and heard, as an all-encompassing, multi-faith spirituality rather than this Baroque-era sense that more specifically imagines “theology heard as sound.”

Stockings are coming down, crumpled wrapping paper’s being shoved into recycling bins, and people worldwide are skeptically patting their winter weight in anticipation of the coming year. While we whole-heartedly support your decisions to start taking cross-acro-zum-fit classes and maintaining a strict paleo-free-tarian diet, why not add something painless to your resolution list?

But listen to it, and I mean REALLY listen to it. Does that C minor chord sound like home, or just a temporary passing chord on its way to the dominant? I respect those who feel differently, but my ears practically beg it to go to that E♭ and it doesn’t, which is why I dig it.